MMJ May Help Those Suffering from Crohn’s Disease

MMJ May Help Those Suffering from Crohn’s Disease

Over the years, researchers have discovered the power of marijuana to help people suffering from myriad health conditions. Add Crohn’s disease to the list.

Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease characterized by inflammation of the digestive, or gastrointestinal tract. The symptoms of this disease can be very incapacitating for patients, sometimes stopping them from holding down jobs or having a social life — or both. According to a new study, however, cannabis could offer relief to patients dealing with this frustrating condition.

As Grizzle.com reports, an Israeli team of gastroenterology specialists conducted a study on 46 patients. Some were given cannabis oil, others a placebo. The study showed that those taking cannabis oil saw “a significant reduction” in their Crohn’s symptoms. The study comes two years after another study, which indicated that cannabis could prove to be effective “therapy for inflammatory bowel disease.”

Crohn’s is but one of many health conditions that could be treated with cannabis. Marijuana has been shown to reduce the number of epileptic episodes — especially among children. It can also be used to reduce pain, which is appealing for multiple sclerosis or arthritis patients. It can also relieve nausea in chemotherapy patients.

As far as Crohn’s is concerned, however, there is one caveat. While it might seem that Crohn’s patients saw relief from their symptoms due to cannabis’ anti-inflammatory properties, the latest study shows otherwise — meaning that more testing is needed, testing that might show that marijuana has even more healing properties that haven’t been discovered yet.

Of course, each time a study shows that marijuana could cure a disease — or, at the very least, alleviate its symptoms — more people rally for legalization. Not only could cannabis help people with Crohn’s, but testing of cannabis for its potential to help people with Crohn’s and other diseases could drive lawmakers to further expand legalization.