Briteside News

Insights from across the cannabis industry
A Look At The Cannabis Movement In The UK
A Look At The Cannabis Movement In The UK
Despite being home to the world’s largest cannabis pharmaceutical manufacturer, or perhaps because of it, efforts in the United Kingdom to provide safe access to botanical cannabis for the chronic and terminally ill are stymied, at least for now. Local activist groups are divided on end goals, but are all closely watching a bill introduced in Parliament last October by Paul Flynn of the Labour Party. Flynn has been leading the charge alone and has faced considerable opposition from within his own party. Flynn has been outspoken about the hypocrisy he sees in the policy as he has struggled to even get his legislation debated in the House of Commons. He has voiced his frustrations about the lack of safe access for suffering citizens to the press, stating publicly, “I would urge them to break the law, because the law, in this case, is an ass.” Flynn’s bill would move the cannabis plant from Schedule I to Schedule II, an acknowledgement that it does, indeed, have medicinal value. “It is a simple matter, the law states that cannabis has no medical advantages, which is an absurdity and very bad science. Whereas, in other parts of the law, the government is actually growing cannabis and promoting its use in some forms, and not the most effective forms in my view,” Flynn said. Formally, No Accepted Medical Value In the UK, cannabis remains federally illegal and a Schedule I controlled drug with no accepted medical use. If this sounds familiar to Americans, that is because it is by design. In 1961, 186 nations (including both the United States and United Kingdom) signed an international treaty, the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, that laid out plans to organize drugs by medicinal value, regulate them accordingly, and work together to ensure conformity of international laws. As a result, the U.S. filled its treaty obligations to create agreed-upon drug scheduling through the Controlled Substances Act of 1970, in the UK it was the United Kingdom Misuse of Drugs Act of 1971. Inevitably, international scheduling and profit-driven research has tended to deem pharmaceutical patented medicines safer than the plants they are derived from. UK citizens caught simply possessing could be punished with fines and up to five years in prison. Producers and distributors face up to 14 years if charged. Even though prohibition is still the law of the land, arrests and incarceration for cannabis have declined by 33 and 48 percent, respectively, since 2010, and some local police jurisdictions have decided not to focus their resources on enforcing cannabis laws at all. There also happens to be a large network of cannabis social clubs that have created a safe access program and distribution scheme that is currently serving the demand for botanical cannabis. %related-post-1% One company, however, has the exclusive ability to produce cannabis medicines in the UK and is about to become the first FDA-approved pharmaceutical manufacturer of such medicines in the United States: GW Pharmaceuticals. GW Pharmaceuticals has two drugs approved for use in the UK and other parts of the world now, Sativex™ (nabiximols) and Epidiolex™ (cannabidiol). Unlike predecessor cannabinoid-drugs, like Marinol™ (dronabinol), a drug consisting solely of synthetic delta 9-THC (which was FDA-approved in the US in 1985), Epidiolex and Sativex are alcohol-based tinctures derived from whole botanical cannabis that utilize “the entourage effect” not found in isolates like Marinol. The impending approval of Epidiolex for treatment in drug-resistant epilepsy has hyped GW’s stock, which some believe could grow nearly 50 percent after the approval. On one hand, when the US starts approving drugs like Epidiolex and Sativex, activists can point to their approval as proof cannabis itself is safe, and that is essentially the argument Flynn is making with his bill now in UK Parliament. On the other hand, getting any drug through the approval processes to market and turning a profit can cost hundreds of millions of dollars, and that money doesn’t come cheap. The very nature of proving cannabis is safe is also what may prevent the plant itself from decriminalization: research work is not charity nor is it government sponsored, it is a for-profit endeavor and GW Pharmaceuticals are not the only company looking to profit from the international demand for cannabis medicine. Investment groups in the UK, US and Canada have been clamoring to put their money into competing ventures. Many UK and US activists are distrustful of pharmaceutical-cannabis companies like GW because they feel the profit-incentive is in direct conflict with the social justice and human rights goals at the core of the medical cannabis movement. Flynn describes his goals as getting medicine to patients first, but also calling attention to the failure of cannabis prohibition as a whole and a call to follow the available science and learn from history. Flynn’s Effort Flynn introduced The Legislation of Cannabis for Medical Purposes Act (Bill 108) in October 2017. When the bill finally received a reading in Parliament this February, it was effectively filibustered by members of his own party and the second of three readings in the House of Commons was pushed to this June. Flynn attributes the opposition from within his own party to one thing: “cowardice.” Like the United States, the United Kingdom has a bicameral government. Legislation must be approved by both houses and the head of state before it becomes law. Unlike the US, not all of England’s Parliament are elected. The House of Commons (or, “house of commoners”) is democratically elected and functions much like the U.S. House of Representatives (except the live debates are way better television). Legislation either starts by citizen petition or is brought by a Member of Parliament (MP) in the House of Commons. Legislation must then be approved by the royally-appointed House of Lords (like the Senate) before being approved by the Queen. While there are currently about 10 parties represented in Parliament, the majority are either Conservatives (Tories) or Labour Party. %related-post-1% Flynn is a member of the Labour Party and has served as a member of Parliament since 1987 representing the Welsh constituency of Newport West. Flynn has a professional background in science, having worked for nearly 30 years as an industrial chemist, which he says is how he has come to the conclusion cannabis is safe and prohibition is the real problem. He says that beyond “killing people and wasting huge sums of money”, he is motivated to continue pushing cannabis law reform because the UK’s current policies are “especially cruel to those who suffer ailments that cannabis will treat He says that while he has some support among other Labour MPs, leadership has no desire to even give his bill a fair hearing. He doesn’t go as far as suggesting the government (or individual members) have a financial incentive to continue the criminalization of botanical cannabis while giving the green light to GW Pharmaceuticals to supply the world. He does, however, point to the fact that fellow MP Victoria Atkins is married to the general manager of British Sugar, Paul Kenward, who are the exclusive growers of cannabis for GW. Atkins, a Conservative, also happens to be the UK Drugs Minister and works directly under the Home Office (the UK equivalent of the DEA). British Sugar was historically a part of the British government and although they are a private company today, the close ties to Parliament remain. On a side note, here is an enlightening video of Victoria Atkins having a friendly public discussion with the United State’s “quarterback of the anti-legalization movement”, Kevin Sabet: https://youtu.be/xunngQDv9SQ Despite the uphill climb, Flynn, an octogenarian with no other political ambitions, says he will continue pushing forward with this issue because someone must take a stand against “politicians acting in blind denial of the facts and evidence.” In the UK, Parliament will consider for debate issues brought by citizens if a petition reaches 100,000 signatures for the issue. In 2015, a petition to fully legalize cannabis received 203,000 signatures, at the time the second-highest ever for a citizen petition. Parliament refused to debate it. The Elephant in the Room “In the UK, this money, this backing and this manipulation has really split the activist scene and caused a lot of distrust between a lot of people and a lot of organizations,” said Alistar Burrell. Burrell adds that most groups are suspecting the others of being more invested in “money and positioning” rather than simply changing a law together because they think it is wrong. Burrell, an IT professional by trade, also runs the Bristol cannabis social club, organized by the United Kingdom Cannabis Social Clubs (UKCSC). The UKCSC operates similar to early US medical collectives and operate outside of the law. They are an organized network of regional clubs that bring cannabis consumers and growers together to “make sure everyone gets what they need”. For medical patients, they send product to a Spanish testing lab to screen for pesticides and measure potency. (No, he is not worried that Brexit will hinder this). Unlike the UPA, the UKCSC takes both a medical and social justice approach, advocating for decriminalization and a citizen’s right to grow their own. %related-post-3% He says enforcement of cannabis laws in the UK vary by region and police force, but in Bristol, a city of artists and musicians, police are no longer prioritizing cannabis crimes. While Burrell generally supports Flynn’s legislation, he acknowledges that even if it passed, the clubs would remain outside the law. He also feels it doesn’t have support in Parliament largely because of financial interests in companies like GW Pharmaceuticals. “I don’t trust any of of these guys because they are purely looking at the money to be made. The problem with big business is once you start spending money, you want that to come back again,” said Burrell. “It’s utterly fucked,” said Tom Lincoln, a London-based actor, cannabis patient and activist. “How should we wait months and months and months for the government to even decide they are going to hear this, and all the while we labor on under [a law that states cannabis has] no medical benefit and no one is licensed to sell it? Whereas, the big elephant in the room is GW Pharma.” Lincoln recently started volunteering with one of the more prominent cannabis groups, the United Patients Alliance (UPA), though he supports and works with activists across various groups. The UPA have a professionally-branded campaign and media presence, but do not promote the right to grow at home, eschew acts of civil disobedience and have taken a somewhat controversial stance of embracing GW Pharmaceuticals. The UPA is the most organized group supporting patients, but activists outside of it point to big business ties on the group’s board that they feel drive its motivations. In 2017, they added a new trustee and small-time donor, Gavin Sathianathan, CEO of Forma Holdings. Forma has a partnership with Oxford University to study and produce cannabinoid-medicines in much the same way as GW Pharmaceuticals. Forma, which has offices in London and Los Angeles, was formed and financed through partners at Kingsley Capital. Forma also has a separate fund, Anthos Ventures, which includes investments in most of the operations affiliated with California cannabis magnate Steve D’Angelo: Harborside Health Center, FLRish and The Arcview Group. Also under Anthos is Altai Brands, which include Dixie Elixirs and Foria cannabis lube. They maybe best remembered for the meat platter served on a mostly-nude model at an after party for the 2016 MJBizCon in Las Vegas. So, while the UK may be the world’s biggest producer of cannabis pharmaceuticals and among the biggest financiers of the global industry, consumers and patients are stuck outside Parliament begging for mercy. Pharmaceutical Extracts versus Botanical Access Despite being an untested theory, the theory of pharmacologicalism has prevailed in Western medicine. It goes like this: isolated or synthesized patentable plant compounds are safer than the plants they come from. It may sound crazy, but the entire drug scheduling and drug approval system used in the United States, the United Kingdom and hundreds of other countries, is based on this false but profitable premise. As this unproven ideology prevails, patients suffer. In speaking of his inspiration to bring about the schedule change in the UK, Paul Flynn points to the case of Alfie Dingley, an epileptic boy who suffers over 150 seizures daily. The Home Office has said they would consider allowing Dingley legal access to cannabis medicines, but have yet to make a decision. The Home Office has previously denied the Dingleys, and they may have to wait for the legal version, produced by GW, to be approved. Still, Flynn is pushing for the approach to follow the science. “There isn’t any rational reason left to deny cannabis is a medicine,” Flynn said.
All About Extracts: CO2 Oils
All About Extracts: CO2 Oils
In this installments of “All About Extracts,” we are tackling CO2 oil processing also known as Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE). CO2 oil extraction employs a unique system that hinges on gases that have been compressed beyond their “critical point.” The critical point is the threshold in which gas turns to liquid, or vice versa, by heat or pressure. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most frequently used gas because its critical point can be reached more easily, at around 90 degrees fahrenheit. %related-post-1% In cannabis processing, when CO2 turns into liquid at its critical point, it strips out the cannabis  trichomes — fine plant hairs — which are collected when the CO2 is turned back into gas.  With lower critical point temperatures, this helps preserve as much of the super-volatile trichomes that are in this amazing plant we call cannabis.   A common misconception is that CO2 oil is solventless, but there are very few oils that are solventless. Rosin is an example of a solvent-free oil because it uses no solvent in its process. Carbon dioxide is a solvent just like butane. CO2 is not toxic, though, and leaves no residual trace of its use. With vapor pressure being so high, the CO2 simply disappears. And with the high pressures used in the CO2 method, there is a danger that the delicate terpenes that are being stripped from the plant material will be destroyed in this extraction process. By siphoning out terpenes before they pull the THC and CBD, these delicate terpenes remain safe and preserved. %related-post-2% Most CO2 oils you will find on the shelves will be in cartridges or pens because of the viscosity of the oil is perfect for vaping. CO2 hash oil produces a nice clear runny oil. It is almost too messy to dab, but is perfect for pens. CO2 hash oil has became popular, in part, because of the perceived health benefits, but this is common misconception.  Both BHO and CO2 hash oil go through rigorous amounts of testing to make sure what is going into your body is safe. CO2 hash oil produces a smooth smoke that is nice and light, which makes for a great introductory experience for the early cannabis user or if you just want to be discreet. Articles in the “All About Extracts” series History of Hash Bubble Hash and Ice Hash BHO Shatters, Sugar Wax and Crumble CO2 Oil THC-A Crystalline
5 Reasons We’re Excited To Launch Cannabis Delivery In Portland
5 Reasons We’re Excited To Launch Cannabis Delivery In Portland
There are countless reasons why we’re excited to launch cannabis delivery in Portland. Out of them all, though, here are five of the biggest reasons. But if you want cannabis delivered to you without reading this list, then head over to our Shop Now page ASAP. The City of Roses. Ah yes, Portland, Oregon. We are, to be completely honest, beside ourselves with excitement to finally launch our cannabis delivery service in this dynamo of a town. It’s a natural, no-brainer of a partnership. We could go on for days citing the reasons we’re happy to be here. But, since you no doubt have other things to do today, we’ll settle for these five. Great food No shocker here. After all, one of the most popular duos of all time is good cannabis and good food. And it’s no secret that Portland has an enviable culinary community that our products complement nicely. Whether it’s tapas from Ataula, Szechuan wontons from Duck House, or a sugary treat from Voodoo Doughnut, we know Briteside is the perfect pairing for Portland’s delectable food scene. Incredible outdoors Hey, we have absolutely nothing against cannabis and couch time. We’re fans of it, actually. However, for those moments when the spirit moves us to get outside and be active, it’s hard to beat the natural beauty surrounding Portland. From Forest Park right outside downtown to nearby breath-takers like Eagle Creek and Tryon Creek State Natural Area, Portland is an outdoor wonderland. Nonstop entertainment When we’re not stuffing our faces or working those calories off on a closeby trail, Portland is loaded with in-town places and events that keep us moving. Awesome venues like Mississippi Studios and Dante’s: Check. Unique festivals like Pickathon and Soul'd Out: Check. And let’s not forget museums and sports: Check and check. Portland is a feast for fun, and we always brag about it. A leading cannabis industry It’s like a scientific fact, or something: People like to be around people they identify with — and so do businesses. As a cannabis company, we are inspired by others in this up-and-coming industry, and we want to surround ourselves with the best peers. Portland, naturally, is the place to be when it comes to cannabis. We are thrilled to join its already thriving roster of cannabis companies and leaders. Dang good people Sort of related to the last point, we feel like we’re good people. But we already know Portland is filled with tons of good people. So, it doesn’t take a professional matchmaker to figure out that we’re going to hit it off well. Now, just head over to brtside.com, fill up your cart, and we’ll come introduce ourselves...with some goodies, of course!
These Are The Cannabis Articles You Like To Read
These Are The Cannabis Articles You Like To Read
We publish a lot of cannabis articles here at the Sugar Leaf, and while they all attract plenty of eyeballs, here are the ones readers seem to like the most. The cannabis industry is booming with no signs of slowing down anytime soon. Sure, there are hurdles (side-eye at Jeff Sessions), but we remain bullish about matters. And while we love to connect you to the best cannabis products, we also enjoy providing you with worthwhile cannabis articles. Of those articles, here are the types our readers engage with the most. Anything by Angela Bacca We are fortunate to have Oregon-based industry guru Angela Bacca as a regular contributor to the Sugar Leaf. She’s incredibly well-versed in all things cannabis, from growing to policy, and her insights never disappoint. Why The Legalization Of Marijuana Is Not Enough Cannabis In A Commodity Market Marijuana Prices Are Plummeting: What Does It Mean? Chris Roberts’ wordsmithing Chris Roberts is an OG writer in the marijuana world with bylines in just about every cannabis publications you’ve heard of. From San Francisco, he supplies us with editorial goodness twice monthly, and our readers love his work. What To Do When Some Cannabis Voters Aren’t Your Friends The 5 Biggest Cannabis Roadblockers In Washington D.C. First Impressions From California’s Commercial Cannabis Rollout Classical music as a smoking backdrop No lie, we were kind of surprised by how well these posts performed, but hey, we’re happy to learn our readers have high-brow musical tastes. Our Classical Music for Marijuana series is relatively new, and we look forward to publishing more installments. Classical Music For Marijuana, Volume 1: Frédéric Chopin's Nocturnes Classical Music For Marijuana, Volume 2: Le carnaval des animaux by Camille Saint-Saëns Classical Music For Marijuana, Volume 3: English Suites by Johann Sebastian Bach Law and politics There are no two ways about this: Given the mishmash of federal, state, and local laws related to cannabis, it is impossible to understand the industry today without following law and politics closely. These are always at the top of our most read cannabis articles. Cities Move To Erase Past Marijuana Convictions Marijuana Law In America: A Brief History How Legal American Marijuana Is Helping Kill Border Violence Cannabis industry did-you-knows? Not a week goes by that we don’t come across some tidbit of information that makes us say “hmmmm.” In its nascent state, the cannabis industry is littered with new findings that easily make their way into conversations. “Say, did you know….?” How Marijuana Consumer Preferences Are Driving The Vape Boom How Mexican Marijuana Prohibition Has Reversed The Flow Of Cannabis Smuggling How Big Tobacco And Marijuana Are Merging Music recommendations It’s no secret that music is a perfect cannabis complement. In addition to our classical series and best of the month recommendations, we also have a robust collection of other music articles. And they ALWAYS get tons of interaction from readers. One Stoner’s Top Rap Albums Of 2017 5 Electronic Acts You Should Know (And Smoke To) 5 Great Grateful Dead Live Albums Cannabis 101 information People love to learn about cannabis. And as the industry grows, more people are wanting to have their questions answered. Our 101-type cannabis articles are big time favorites of our readership. And we’re always building out this content. Why THC Content Shouldn't Be The Only Variable Influencing Your Cannabis Purchase Why Does Weed Make You Hungry? What Are Cannabis Hybrids? Whatever the angle, we’re always working to get you the most helpful cannabis articles. Shoot an email to editor@brtside.com to let us know what you'd like to read more about, and follow us on Facebook and Twitter, so we can fill your timelines with some good stuff.
Briteside Friends Discuss Veterans Marijuana Study On NBC
Briteside Friends Discuss Veterans Marijuana Study On NBC
Briteside is fortunate to count among our friends some of the leading canna-advocates for America’s military veterans. Two were recently featured on NBC Nightly News, discussing the first ever FDA-approved veterans marijuana trial for former soldiers suffering from PTSD. If you caught NBC Nightly News on November 30, you might have seen Iraq veteran and longtime veterans health and cannabis advocate — who’s also good friend of Briteside — Roberto Pickering (he even donned a Briteside t-shirt for the spot). " frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"> Pickering was interviewed by NBC’s Gabe Gutierrez about his struggles with post-traumatic stress disorder and how cannabis helped him not only overcome his symptoms, but also eliminated the need for the 14 (fourteen!) drugs he’d been prescribed after coming home from war. “I stopped all pills cold turkey, and I picked up cannabis because, in my opinion, it was either find relief or (commit) suicide,” Pickering says in the interview. Pickering isn’t the only veteran facing a similar crossroads, and he’d love to see more research done on the benefits of cannabis for others battling PTSD — research like the kind being done by scientists in Phoenix, Arizona. Dr. Sue Sisley — another Briteside friend — site principal investigator with Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), is the administrator of the first FDA-approved trial of its kind. Sisley says Phoenix was chosen as the location of the study because the city’s VA hospital has highest density of U.S. military veteran patients who continue to suffer from PTSD symptoms despite undergoing VA-administered medical treatment and/or therapy. Sisley says that new treatments for PTSD are desperately needed, and that she, like Pickering, believes cannabis “will reduce the severity of PTSD symptoms.” We’ll present the findings of the veterans marijuana study as soon as they become available. In the meantime, you should definitely watch NBC’s full report.  Keep fighting the good fight, Sue and Roberto.
Briteside Releases “The Dopest” Cannabis Commercial
Briteside Releases “The Dopest” Cannabis Commercial
Briteside releases “the dopest” cannabis commercial, according to industry insiders. To coincide with the launch of their cannabis delivery service, Briteside has released a cannabis commercial unparalleled in the legal marijuana industry. " frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"> Briteside partnered with Sandwich Video out of Los Angeles to produce the commercial. Sandwich’s client roster is chock full of top-tier brands, including Facebook, Starbucks, Uber Airbnb, and Amazon Studios. That impressive list spurred Briteside CEO Justin Junda to reach out to Sandwich. “When you’re looking to for a video production partner to manage your company’s initial public-facing presence, you have to trust that partner completely,” said Junda. “We saw what Sandwich had done for other companies, and we believe Sandwich delivered a wonderful commercial for us at Briteside.” %related-post-1% Junda’s sentiment is shared across the cannabis industry. Dope Magazine, one of the most popular marijuana industry publications, called Briteside’s video “The Dopest Cannabis Commercial (Ever)” — that’s high praise. For those familiar with pharmaceutical advertisements, the Briteside commercial will seem familiar. With one big difference: Humor. Sandwich and Briteside decided on a creative take blending the calming aesthetic appeal of pharma commercials with a subtle Saturday Night Live-like humor. The result was a “spot on” cannabis commercial. “I can't tell you the last time I enjoyed a commercial as much as I enjoyed Briteside's first ad," said Andy Williams, CEO of Medicine Man, a cannabis industry leader. "It is spot on, and quite frankly I hope we start seeing more video production like that in our space since it presents cannabis consumption is an everyday, relatable light.” As for the product itself, Briteside is launching its cannabis delivery service first in Oregon. Successes there will inform future rollouts in other states across the U.S. Briteside begins with a Shop Now service, which delivers individual online cannabis orders in roughly an hour. Soon, they’ll launch Discovery, a recurring delivery service that introduces consumers to new strains and products. They’re currently taking sign-ups for that service.
Marijuana Delivery: What The Industry Is Learning
Marijuana Delivery: What The Industry Is Learning
According to a new report, legal cannabis sales in California are projected to hit $2.8 billion next year, and reach $6.6 billion by 2025. And who’s driving those sales? Millennials. Not only does the report give us a clearer picture of who is jumping at the chance to buy legal weed, but it also provides a glimpse of how marijuana delivery purchases made online are impacting the cannabis industry.   The study, prepared by cannabis analytics company New Frontier Data in conjunction with online marijuana delivery marketplace Green Rush, outlines product trends, market growth, and consumer demographic numbers — numbers showing that millennials account for a whopping 80% of all online cannabis sales.
 %related-post-1% Increased access to legal weed, as well as millennials’ embrace of technology and increased preference for pot over alcohol, have all combined to drive those sales. And while that growth in cannabis sales shows no sign of slowing down, the report predicts retail prices to decline over the long term, especially if more producers are granted licenses or if larger producers enter the market.  
 Here Are Some More of the Study’s Findings: Cannabis flower products top online cannabis sales, representing 70% of products sold via greenRush.com. Cannabis concentrate represents 22% of online cannabis sales through the site, with its market share predicted to grow year-over-year as consumers increasingly move toward non-flower and liquid vaporization products. Smaller product package sizes dominate marijuana delivery sales, as consumers prefer the flexibility of purchasing smaller quantities, but more frequently. As the report indicates, specific demographic and product segments are the main drivers of demand and “will have a major impact on product packaging, brands, new service providers, and backing-investors entering the space” nationwide. %related-post-2% “Significant changes are already underway in California for medical cannabis and adult use laws, which we see will have major implications for the cannabis industry, including e-commerce and delivery services in the state,” Giadha Aguirre de Carcer, CEO of New Frontier Data, said. “As the largest state in the country — and the largest potential market for cannabis products — the implications for the growth of the industry because of California’s adult use market cannot be overstated.”
This Is How Briteside Delivery Works
This Is How Briteside Delivery Works
So you want to know how Briteside delivery works, right? Well, you’ve come to the right place. But first things first, let us all pause for a moment to reflect on the wonder that is legal cannabis. It really is amazing, isn’t it? And though we still have a long way to go in our fight for further legalization and decriminalization, we stand in a fairly remarkable place today considering where we’ve come from. %related-post-1% What’s more, not only can we (in some states) freely purchase and consume cannabis, we can even (in some places) order cannabis online have it delivered to our homes. Which, is why you’re reading this now. Okay, okay. Now back to explaining how Briteside delivery works. Briteside partners with your favorite local dispensaries The key to understanding how Briteside delivery works is knowing that all the products we offer come from your favorite local dispensaries. It’s true. Each of our partner dispensaries has their own page on our site where they regularly update which products they have in stock. When you visit the Briteside website, the inventory you see listed is the same inventory you’d find if you walked into your favorite dispensary. The main difference being that you can peruse the menu from the comfort of your couch, your bed, your office chair, your pool float, your...well, you get the point. Gone are the days of driving to the dispensary only to find out your preferred products aren’t available. We can recommend products or your can choose on your own If you know exactly what products you want, great. You can head over to our “Shop Now” page and select those items to go in your cart. However, if you need a little help deciding, you can sort through our menu by product category (flower, edibles, topicals, etc), strain type, or the desired mood you want to enjoy during your cannabis experience. Once you’ve filtered down the menu to your liking, you can choose the right products for you and put them in your cart. %related-post-2% Tell us when and where to deliver your cannabis products Once you’ve filled up your cart with your favorite cannabis products, you tell us when and where to deliver them, so long as you live in an area where cannabis delivery is permitted. You can even opt for in-store pickup if you want. As of now, Briteside operates on a cash on delivery (COD) basis. What that means is you don’t have to pay until your online order has been delivered to your residence. And don’t forget, Briteside can only deliver cannabis to the person that ordered it. So if you made the order, we can only deliver it to you personally. To get started, visit our “Shop Now” page. But if you still have questions about Briteside, head over to our FAQ page or our "What Is Briteside, Anyway?" post.  *If you live in a Briteside market that does not allow residential delivery, it’s all good. You can still make your order through our site, and then pick it up at your favorite dispensary. We’ll have it waiting on you.
3 Reasons You Should Order Cannabis Online
3 Reasons You Should Order Cannabis Online
If you’d told cannabis consumers a decade ago that they’d be able to order cannabis online in just a few short years, your statement would likely be met with one of two responses: A hi-five or a skeptical “yeah right” look of disbelief. But here we are, friends. It’s 2017, and in a handful of states you can have cannabis delivered to your doorstep. What a time to be alive! %related-post-1% And while it’s pretty tough to replicate the enjoyable experience of visiting a top-tier dispensary and holding a conversation with a knowledgeable budtender — the sommeliers of spliff — it’s also really nice having someone deliver your favorite cannabis product to your residence. With that in mind, here are three reasons you should order cannabis online and have it handed to you on your front porch. And if this list whets your cannabis appetite, try making a Briteside delivery order.  No long lines Even if you’re a “people person,” your preferred environment for interacting with other humans probably isn’t waiting in a (sometimes long) line at a store. If we’re wrong about you in this regard, ignore this bullet point, but we’re just going to assume you prefer face-to-face interaction as opposed to staring-at-the-back-of-a-stranger’s-head “interaction.” You can stay in your PJs Okay, technically you can wear your jam-jams to a dispensary (we’re not hating on that). But on the chance you subscribe to fashion-based social norms, going out in public requires something like jeans and a t-shirt, at least. Sometimes, though, you don’t want peel out of your fleece pajama pants and abandon your Netflix binge to drive to the dispensary. In moments like those, a cannabis hand-off at your door is probably preferable. Keeps your schedule simple Like your daily schedule isn’t hectic enough already — throwing in an extra errand to pick up cannabis sometimes doesn’t make for an easy addition to your adulting checklist. For shame! If you’re up to your eyeballs in chores and errands and other pressing matters, just order cannabis online and have someone bring it to you so you can keep knocking out your other responsibilities. %related-post-2% And remember, when you do order cannabis online, order with Briteside. We partner with the best local dispensaries to bring your favorite products directly to you. It’s that simple. Have questions about Briteside? That's a-ok. Either head over to our FAQ page or give our "What Is Briteside, Anyway?" post a read. *We would be remiss if we didn't include this one caveat: In order for Briteside to deliver cannabis to your residence, you must live in an area where cannabis delivery is permitted. That said, if you do live in a Briteside market where delivery is not (yet!) permitted, you can still order cannabis online and pick up your Briteside order at your favorite dispensary. 
What Is Briteside, Anyway? We're Glad You Asked
What Is Briteside, Anyway? We're Glad You Asked
It seems that as the cannabis industry and the laws that govern it evolve at lightspeed, new businesses enter the marketplace every other (or every single?) day. We hope that continues to be the case, as cannabis consumers — whether they be of the medical or adult use variety — are long overdue in having the ability to enjoy the best cannabis products whenever, and wherever, they choose. At Briteside, we hope this trend continues because our aim...wait...you’re probably wondering something like "um, but what is Briteside?” right about now, aren’t you? Good question. We're glad you asked. What is Briteside? It's your best option for ordering cannabis online The good news is that you now have the ability to purchase and consume cannabis without worry if you live in a state that has seen the light. Hurray for that! %related-post-1% However, thanks to a mishmash of laws and regulations, the experience is not as simple or straightforward as enjoying your favorite craft beer or beauty products. While we don’t have a magic wand to rid the cannabis industry of its confusion and complexity overnight, Briteside is here to help make it easier for you to order cannabis online. That's right, you can order your favorite cannabis products from your favorite local dispensaries online and a Briteside delivery courier will deliver it to your door. Why does Briteside partner with local dispensaries? At Briteside, we believe your local dispensaries deserve all the help they can get. These shops are typically owned and operated by good, knowledgeable people who have a desire to supply cannabis consumers with the best products they possibly can. And we want to help them, as well as the consumers they serve. Every Briteside partner dispensary has its own page on the the Briteside website where they can list their in-stock inventory. This gives consumers the chance to scan an active menu from their home, or office, or...wherever, really. %related-post-2% No more standing in line at the dispensary only to find out a particular item is out of stock. Shoppers can then order their products online, and either pick them up at the dispensary, or — where available — Briteside will deliver them to their residence. Really, Briteside will deliver cannabis to your door. Give Briteside a try Whether you opt for in-store pickup, or you prefer cannabis delivery, give Briteside a try. We’d love to help you get your favorite products from your favorite local dispensary. Oh, and stay tuned. The answer to the question "What is Briteside?" will get much longer in the very near future. (How's that for a teaser?) If you have more questions about Briteside, be sure to head over to our FAQ page.